Michael Tobis

Michael Tobis

Michael Tobis, editor-in-chief of Planet3.0 and site cofounder, has always been interested in the interface between science and public policy. He holds a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin - Madison in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences where he developed a 3-D ocean model on a custom computing platform. He has been involved in sustainability conversations on the internet since 1992, has been a web software developer since 2000, and has been posting sustainability articles on the web since 2007.

Recent Articles

Texas and Climate Change – Victim, Villain, or Hero

That’s mt speaking

(mt is sorry about all the grinning at his own jokes, which doesn’t come off well. Now he understands about deadpan.)

The point is entirely serious., though. The world very much needs Texas onboard the transition to the future, and the way to get Texas on board is to appeal to honor and courage, not to guilt.

Projections of climate change by the IPCC are deeply skeptical, and there is no attempt to hide the large uncertainty of climate forecasts. … Ironically, those labeled “skeptics” by the media are not in fact skeptical; they are, on the contrary, quite sure that there is no risk going forward. Meanwhile, those interested in treating the issue as an objective problem in risk assessment and management are labeled “alarmists”, a particularly infantile smear considering what is at stake. [more]

Nebraska Flash Flood

A flash flood enters a newly renovated hospital lobby in Kearney NE; this video was released by the hospital and has been posted to YouTube a bunch of times. The Good Samaritan Hospital Facebook post says:

While our recovery efforts from the flash flooding early Saturday morning continue on a nearly round-the-clock basis, our services for patients have all been been restored. We’re overwhelmingly grateful to each person and entity who has assisted us in this effort.

It’s hard to put into words exactly what Saturday’s conditions were like and just how seriously our facility was impacted. And to say that we’re emotional about the whole situation is a bit of an understatement. This security camera footage is just a glimpse into the series of events that unfolded Saturday. Again, we’re so relieved that no patients, staff or physicians were injured in this incident.

Enormous rain events have been widespread across the quadrant of the US north and east of Nebraska in the subsequent recent few days, including expensive disasters in Detroit, Baltimore and Long Island. This fits the pattern of increased extreme rainfall in the north central and northeastern states and central Canada.

UPDATE: Islip New York has set a single-day site precipitation record for the state of 13.27 inches, comfortably eclipsing the previous record of 11.6 inches set two years ago at Tannersville during TS Irene. Records have to be set sometime, but this is the same system that caused spectacular floods across numerous states, and that has to be unusual.

Morano is in full denial, leading with some crufty old Roger Pielke stuff from 2011.

Net Global Radiative Imbalance

Improvements in characterizing global interannual variation and trend in global heat flux.

Yes there probably is an upward trend. There is substantial uncertainty in the vertical axis offset, though it probably is warming.

And yes, El Nino years are cooling years. Does this surprise you?

Screen Shot 2014-08-10 at 6.47.38 PM

Allan, R. P., C. Liu, N. G. Loeb, M. D. Palmer, M. Roberts, D. Smith, and P.-L. Vidale (2014), Changes in global net radiative imbalance 1985–2012, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41

DOI: 10.1002/2014GL060962