Michael Tobis

Michael Tobis

Michael Tobis, editor-in-chief of Planet3.0 and site cofounder, has always been interested in the interface between science and public policy. He holds a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin - Madison in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences where he developed a 3-D ocean model on a custom computing platform. He has been involved in sustainability conversations on the internet since 1992, has been a web software developer since 2000, and has been posting sustainability articles on the web since 2007.

Recent Articles

On Commenting at P3

Comments sent by anyone other than a logged-in member are moderated before posting, usually within a day. Comments, if any, that don’t appear to constructive are visible in each article’s “shadow thread” visible at the bottom of the comments with a “click *here*” link. If your comment appears in neither place within a couple of days, it was a false positive for the spam detectors, and fell afoul of the automated spam filter. [more]

Shell Signs Trillion Ton Manifesto

Unilever, Shell, BT, and EDF Energy are among 70 leading companies today calling on governments across the globe to step up efforts to tackle climate change. The statement urges political leaders to set a timeline for achieving net zero emissions before the end of the century, design a credible strategy to transform the energy system, and create a plan to tackle the global economy’s reliance on fossil fuels. [more]

April Open Thread

Suggested Topic: Have you read the IPCC WG II Summary for Policymakers yet? Or are you all focused on whether Nate Silver’s choice of Roger Pielke Jr. as a climate statistician makes any sense?

Anything goes. Moderation is lighter than on other articles.

New Journal Statement re “Recursive Fury”

The journal has belatedly issued an explanation of the retraction that does not make them look quite as stupid at first glance. They did not retract their earlier position, though, that there were no “academic or ethical” issues with the study. Their position now emerges as incoherent, and new evidence coming out makes matters look even worse for them.
[more]